Treasured Stories: «Tex’s Bad Dream or ‘The Egg Lady’s Revenge’» (1988)

« You really saw that things were not at all what was portrayed in the mass media… at least not in our neighborhood. It was just a conclusion that most of the kids of that age came to, that things were extremely corrupt. » — Spain Rodriguez

While plenty of cartoonists trod the path of autobiography before him, it took Manuel ‘Spain’ Rodriguez (1940-2012) to truly show how it should be done: here at last was a genuine full-blooded practitioner, hardly content to merely observe from the sidelines, blending with the wallpaper. Lover, brawler, consummate graphic storyteller: a scarce combination indeed.

The following tale belongs to a cycle recounting the exploits and insights of The North Fillmore Intelligentsia, Spain’s closest compadres in Buffalo of the 1950s. Tex’s Bad Dream… originally appeared in Blab! No. 3 (Sept. 1988, Kitchen Sink Press); indeed, Spain’s recollections became, over time, the sole reason to purchase the once-excellent Blab! Mercifully, most of these were collected, in their usual exemplary fashion, by Fantagraphics, as Cruisin’ With the Hound (2012). You’ll still be lacking the mysteriously-omitted, quite essential « How I Almost Got Stomped to the “Still of the Night” by the “Five Satins » (Prime Cuts No. 2, Mar. 1987, Fantagraphics), which you can find in another Spain anthology, My True Story (1994, Fanta again).

In the meantime, enjoy, with my compliments, this true-life tale of original EC Fan-Addicts, facial restructuring, cautionary dreams, isometrics and pork sandwiches.

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-RG

4 thoughts on “Treasured Stories: «Tex’s Bad Dream or ‘The Egg Lady’s Revenge’» (1988)

    • gasp65 January 13, 2019 / 21:21

      I don’t know how *typical* an introduction to his work this is, but I think it’s a good one. As far as influence on Los Bros Hernandez, I don’t recall offhand Spain being mentioned… but as a pivotal Hispanic underground comix pioneer (along with his fellow Zap-per Victor Moscoso), the brothers *had* to be aware of his achievements. Can’t say I detect much stylistic resemblance, but thematically, there’s plenty of common ground. Convincing depictions of friendships and everyday life, to name but a couple facets.

      Liked by 1 person

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